Mooresville Public Library

Mooresville Public Library
MPL Courtyard

Friday, May 15, 2015

Morgan County (and Other Hoosier) Bridge Histories


Dr. James L. Cooper, professor emeritus of history at DePauw University, has a historical bridges database available online.  Click the links below to find information about Morgan County (and other Indiana) bridges.

We also have two computer CDs with bridge photos to accompany the database information. They are available to checkout in our Evergreen Indiana catalog.

Dr. Cooper has published books recounting the history of Hoosier bridges.  These are available to checkout in our Evergreen Indiana catalog.



Click book covers to go to E.I. catalog

Thursday, May 14, 2015

Two-Twenty-Two-Twenty-Two



Click Photos to Enlarge


On February 22, 1922 (that's 2/22/22, at least in the U.S.), Mooresville High School students celebrated a basketball victory over Monrovia (24 points to 22 points) around the "silent policeman" stand in the middle of the intersection of Main and Indiana Streets in downtown Mooresville, Indiana.

Note the horse carriage and the automobile, which were parked in separate areas "reserved" for horse-drawn vehicles (on North Indiana St.) and motor vehicles (on East Main St.) The I.O.O.F. building is in the background, where today stands Paul Hadley mini-park.

Note, too, that the "silent policeman" has been positioned incorrectly--it should have been turned 180 degrees to correctly designate directions to the cities listed. (The stand could be moved. This was a popular prank among high schoolers from neighboring communities. They would steal the "silent policeman" and haul it away somewhere, and Mooresville police would have to bring it back.)

Fall Creek Furniture Company (ca. 1901-1930)


Undated photo of Fall Creek Furniture Company (probably circa 1925-1930)(photographer unknown)
(Click photos to enlarge)



Fall Creek Furniture Company
(photo before 1930 provided by Mrs. Kenneth Fields).


Fall Creek Furniture Company (circa 1901-1930) at one time employed 500 people, many of whom took the interurban railway from Indianapolis (or surrounding communities) to work at the factory, which was located along old state road 67 near Bridge Street in Mooresville, Indiana. This was later the site of Automotive Armature (1944-1993). Our online handout has more information about the history of the furniture factory.

Wednesday, April 29, 2015

New Bridge Handouts


We have an updated online handout available about the old red covered bridge formerly located on the Waverly Road just east of Mooresville, Indiana.  We also have a new online handout about the 1901 bridge (and its subsequent replacement) at "House's Branch" of White Lick Creek.


Thursday, April 9, 2015

Shelf Doll: a Poltergeist Experience

A decade ago, one of our library's volunteers investigated an apparent poltergeist case at a friend's house situated near Robb Hill Road, in Morgan County, Indiana.  We will call the friend Imogene, because that's nothing like her actual name.

Click Map to Enlarge

To give some idea of what this case was about, here is our book trailer.

Shelf Doll & Other True Paranormal Tales, by Karl C. B. Muilliwey
(MPL Book Trailer #110)

Imogene's family had moved into the house in 2003.  Apparently, a teenage girl committed suicide in the home five years beforehand, but no one in Imogene's family knew this before investigating. Imogene began experiencing paranormal phenomena a few months after moving into the house. These events occurred at first exclusively in Imogene's bedroom, which was, she subsequently discovered, the same bedroom in which the suicide occurred.  Objects sitting on tables, a desk, the bed, and shelves were rearranged randomly around other places in the room and elsewhere in the home. Imogene alleged that neither she nor her family members had moved these items.  She also began hearing thumping apparently coming from inside the walls of her room. Her parents found no structural causes of this noise, and nobody at the house claimed responsibility for the sounds.

One of Imogene's acquaintances suggested she use a ouija board to attempt communication with a disembodied spirit, assuming one existed and was causing the phenomena.  Ouija board use can be dangerous to novices or frivolous parties, and so she sought someone experienced in psychical research who could protect participants from harm.  A paranormal investigator was retained, and ouija board sessions began.


For those unfamiliar with this device, a ouija board has an indicator (sometimes called a planchette) that moves to letters of the alphabet to spell-out messages.  Often numbers, plus the words yes, no, and goodbye, are included.  Participants lightly place their fingers atop the planchette, which they allow to move by itself, although skeptics claim that the indicator is moved deliberately (or unconsciously) by someone touching it. Often, the planchette moves rapidly across the board.  To safeguard from cheating, participants are frequently blindfolded, and an observer records messages on paper.  This is hardly a fraud-proof means of communication, so it is commonly dismissed among paranormal researchers as unreliable.  The primary investigator, however, had had some interesting results using the safeguards mentioned.

At first, the planchette spelled out nonsensical words, but fairly soon, intelligible messages began to appear.  Purportedly, the teenage girl who committed suicide was communicating.  (Her suicide was later independently established by talking with neighbors.)  She called herself Emily and claimed to be an earth-bound spirit living inside one of Imogene's dolls sitting on a shelf in her bedroom. Numerous personal details were mentioned in the messages, some of which were independently confirmed by neighbors who had known Emily, but which were unknown to anyone investigating.

Occasionally, Emily (or whatever, if anything, was communicating) became irritated or abusive in her messages, and so sessions would usually end.  Once, Imogene turned the doll in which the spirit supposedly resided to face the wall as a punishment for nasty comments.  The planchette then became "highly animated," according to the primary investigator, stating that the doll should be turned back to face forward. Objects then began to propel themselves from the shelves, desk, and tables.  Some struck participants without injury.

Certainly, something strange was occurring in Imogene's house.  The alleged communications continued for several months and then abruptly ceased.  Whatever the true explanation, it was quite an unusual experience for those involved.  It certainly added to the local ghostly folklore of Morgan County.